Peruvian Rainforest (Amazon - Picture Heavy)

Discussion in 'Photos & Photography' started by JEFFREH, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Warning dial-up! There are 4 consecutive posts of pictures!

    Rainforest conservation trip into Manu National Park (Peru). These were all taken with a waterproof coolpix...nothing fancy. Wildlife was very difficult to photograph and I admit I spent more of my time admiring it through my own eyes than through a camera lens. I mostly have scenic shots to share, but there is some wildlife mixed within as well.

    I saw over 125 species of bird, a Jaguar, Giant River Otters, 9 species of Monkey (Red Howler, Spider, White-fronted Capuchin, Brown Capuchin, Squirrel, Emperor Tamarin, Saddle-backed Tamarin, Dusky Titi Monkey, and the very rare and endangered Wooly Monkey). Several Amazon Tree Boas, a juvenile BCC in a tall palm, some dendrobates, hylids, caiman... it was absolutely incredible. Most wildlife photos were taken by colleagues and I'll try to get those posted when possible.
    Also found out that Rhett (ReptileRhett on here, who also went) catches large caiman like a young Steve Irwin!
    Aerial view from out small plane, passing over the Andes from Cusco into Manu forest:
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    The Amazon:
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    The Boca Manu Airstrip... it was a rough landing lol:
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    C. cornuta along a Matsiguanka trail:
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    Sunset on the River - The sun rises at 530am and sets at 530pm here. There is almost no transition between light and utter darkness.
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    Succesional Forest:
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    Pretty Vespid:
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    Bullet Ant - The worst pain in the entire forest. This one was almost 2" long:
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    Ficus, a keystone fruiting species in the forest:
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    Wild Cocoa...note how fruit often grows out of the trunk and bark:
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    Cecilio and Marco, the boatmen. Cecilio (the elder) does not care about money... he takes researchers into the forest hoping purely so they can appreciate it and make efforts to save it. These are some truly remarkable people. They offer to carry all of your luggage for miles with no tip... and haven't seen family in over 4 weeks.

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    Termite Nest - Termites build nests high off the ground due to flooding:
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    Many plants protect themselves with toxins and sharp spines in the forest. This palm has spines that are over 4" long:
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  2. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Phasmid:
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    Jaguar - I feel so privledged to have seen this guy. He just hung out on the log overhanging the water as we passed by along the Madre de Dios. Very rare sight.
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    Jaguar photo taken by our amazing Guide, Dr. Leo Obelitas. This photo will be removed in 24hrs. Please do not repost this without permission:
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    Some Canopy views:
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    Oxbow Lake, Cocha Juarez:
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    Casa de Matsiguanka - the house of the Matsiguanka tribe. Very fascinating and shy indigenous people. They rarely ventured out of their hut here that houses 8 families... I learned a lot from them
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    Guide Leo, talking about the naked tree. It sheds is incredible toxic bark to prevent infestation by ants that dominate the forest. He has a friend who committed suicide by drinking a brew with the bark:
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    Jewel Beetle...impossible to capture the beauty of this insect. Incredible rainbow of colors, irridescence, and it was about 3" long:
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    Corllalus enhydris enhydris - Amazon Tree Boa
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    Hylid - Giant Gladiator Frog (Hypsiboas boans). He was the size of a clenched fist:
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    The 2nd worst pain in the forest to the bullet ant. This caterpillar is called "Koi Koi" in Quechua... which translates to "pain pain"
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    Sunset:
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    White Caiman
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    Snake bird (I think):
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    This is the caustic vine I had alluded to that is used to remedy Bullet Ant stings:
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    Very cool, cryptic frog. Unknown species...anyone want to take a stab at it? Found near Cocha Salvador in detritus, about 250m from the lake in Manu National Park. We didn't have any die-hard frog people with us on this trip and our field guide was for herps was severely limited.
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  3. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Yellow-footed tortoise crossing the Rio de Madres... unusual behavior. We believe it was due to the very unusual dryness (20 days of no rain) that had been ongoing.
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    Urania Moth - these guys were pretty abundant along the river and very pretty. Moth species, despite its butterfly-like appearance:
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    Strangler Fig - a ficus species that is parasitic to other trees. When a primate or similar species eats the seed and defecates on another tree, it begins to grow. It will eventually fuse with the host tree and grow around it; using it as support and for sustenance.
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    Squirrel Monkeys
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    Red and Green Macaws – I hate to say this, but by the end of the stay in the forest you’d see macaws and think “meh, just another macaw.” They were quite common.
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    Heliconia
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    The Manu Lodge…and incredible place
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    Orb Weaving species that I’m told has a silk that is essentially the strongest material in the world. The web was so strong that I would wager small bats could easily become trapped. [​IMG]
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    Pretty roach
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    Coca Tea… not even remotely on the same scale as Cocaine. Comparing the two would be like comparing coffee to meth, but it was some pretty dank tea! Coca is common in the highland culture and encouraged to be chewed or made into a tea for altitude sickness amongst other things.
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    Boca Manu Children
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    Butterflies are attracted to urine…and apparently…turtles. You’d see side-necked turtles basking along the shore and on logs just being swarmed by a diversity of butterflies. The butterflies would give away the turtle’s location ; )
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    Juvenile T?
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  4. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Juvie black caiman
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    Sustainable boat building – they go out and find trees that have fallen by natural causes (i.e. fallen into the river by erosion) and use this wood to make boats rather than cutting trees to do it. They are particularly fond of red cedar. A single boat will take a few months to make but can sell for $3k, which is a LOT of money for these people.
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    Very cool tree
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    Small line of Army Ants. These guys will raid and destroy everything in their path.
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    Some Deondrobate? Maybe?
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    Blood of the Dragon (Croton sp.). This tree has immense pharmaceutical properties within the sap... it is used to relieve ulcers, gastrointestinal ailments, seal and protect open wounds, and can help revert the effects of diabetes
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    Black Vultures. These three were always on the rooftop every single day...probably waiting for someone to die, lol. I named them Ed, Edd, and Eddy. Fun fact: many vultures in the world are becoming very threatened, particularly in Asia where the introduction of Ibuprofen into cattle meat is killing any scavengers who feed on dead cattle. There are turkey vultures down there too (same species as the states) and they have the best smell of any animal in the world (so I've been told).
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    Bolivian Bleating Frog (?)
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    Garlic Tree - you could smell these as you approached as a strong garlic smell. I’m told the bark can be boiled down to relieve sore throats and sinus infections, and stomach ulcers.
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    Hoatzin - a bird that cannot fly very well. These guys were once thought to be a link between lizard/dinosaur ancestors and avians, because juveniles have claws on their wings. They are always over water, and juvies will fall into the water and use the claws on their wings to climb back out onto the bank. When they molt into adult plummage, they lose the claws. Hoatzins are leaf-eaters, and have few predators because they small putrid... they ferment the leaves in their crop prior to digestion which makes their meat very foul.
    Sorry for the crappy photo quality. These are super cool looking birds, look em up online.
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    Big Bee
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    Macaw Clay Lick - you may notice there are no Macaws ; ) it hadn't rained in 20 days which threw off a lot of the normal routines of the wildlife, but these licks are usually filled with hundreds of parrots, macaws, and other bird species. In addition, there was a great black hawk perched off in the distance which made other birds nervous so they refused to land on the lick and give us a show... The birds utilize the clay to neutralize toxins in the seeds they eat (i.e. cyanide)
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    Hanging out in the top of a Ceiba Tree at night, nothing too much to see but the epiphyte growth is cool
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    Saddle-backed Taramin and Emperor Tamarin (he has a super impressive mustache). I'm told the tamrarins always have identical twins, and the males carry the babies around on their backs. If you look closely at the 2nd pic (Emperor Tamarin) you can see the babies on his back :3 .
    Again, sorry the quality.
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  5. StikyPaws312

    StikyPaws312 Moderator Staff Member

    Wow, I have no words... that is an absolutely awesome experience.
     
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  6. LittleLeopard

    LittleLeopard New Member

    Amazing!
     
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  7. JoshSnakeman

    JoshSnakeman New Member

    Looking at these pics makes me want to go Brazil again. Thanks for sharing!
     
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  8. leper65

    leper65 New Member

    Great photos. Love the Jaguar photo!
     
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  9. StikyPaws312

    StikyPaws312 Moderator Staff Member

    I think that's so awesome that they are using sustainable wood rather than cutting it down - so much harder but I'm so happy they are going that extra mile.
     

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