poop?

Discussion in 'Rhacodactylus (Crested) Geckos' started by tyler12, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. tyler12

    tyler12 Embryo

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    ok so i got my cresty yesterday and she hasent pooped yet and i looked all around and shes on paper towels so should i be worried??!??
     
  2. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  3. Shanna66

    Shanna66 Well-Known Member

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    sometimes it takes a crested gecko a week or 2 before they settle in enough to start eating and pooping. jack started eating right away while freya took about a week before i started seeing poops

    its perfeclty normal for any animal not to eat on its first day home, reptiles take a while to get used to their new home and they dont like stress too well so they wont eat until they are comfortable. i usually wait a couple days before i even offer any food to a new reptile
     
  4. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  5. tyler12

    tyler12 Embryo

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    ok thanks im not worried anymore!! :(
     
  6. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  7. StikyPaws312

    StikyPaws312 Moderator

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    Also... you might want to look *up* for the poop... they tend to poop while they are in the "trees" and it may just be stuck up in the foliage...

    Congrats on the new little guy!
     
  8. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  9. tyler12

    tyler12 Embryo

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    thanks and i will be sure to check up in her leaves!!
     
  10. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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  11. crissybac

    crissybac Embryo

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    So if the gecko poops in their leaves, how does one properly clean that? Is there a certain product?
     
  12. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator

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    It depends somewhat on the type of foliage or what is being pooped on:

    For example, if one of mine decides to go on a live plant, I'll simply spray the plant down and wipe the leaves clean of anything visible. I opt to avoid using most chemicals where my herps can come into contact with them, or on a living plant.

    If it's an articifial plant, you can remove it and rinse off the poo with hot water then disinfect with something as simple as a mild hand soap - being sure to rinse off all of the residue before placing it back into the enclosure. If the plant isn't movable, you could use a similar technique in the cage but wiping it with damp and soapy paper towels, and then wiping it down with wet ones.

    In the event that they go on wood or some other surface, I'll employ the same strategy as above. ( An old toothbrush also works great for getting into tight spaces stained by urates)

    If you really want to get nit-picky, which is best for animals that are known to be ill, or are in quarintine, you can use stronger methods of sanititation. I'll also use the strategy I'm about to mention during full cage cleans to make sure everything is completely disinfected and clean... You can pick up some chlorhexidine solution, it's often called Nolvasan in the pet industry - this stuff is great and vets use it do to it's santitation properties and relative safety in close proximitity of animals and reptiles. There are a few other commercial cleaning products out there too if you want to get fancy = )
     
  13. crissybac

    crissybac Embryo

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    Thanks for being so detailed!
     

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