Dark hog island?

Discussion in 'Boas' started by geckolover22, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. geckolover22

    geckolover22 Well-Known Member

    So this little boy is my newest addition. I'm curious if hog islands are all light bright hypo or can they be little dark? Was told he's a pure hog beautiful nonetheless and adore him greatly such a docile boa :)
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    Once he settles in a little I'll take him out to some natural sunlight and take better pics
     
    shane hyde likes this.
  2. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Looks like a beautiful Hog Island BCI to me ; )

    The hypo's are often the result of crossing hypomelanistic Colombian BCI with Hog Island BCI. Some individuals of pure locality are quite light, but the vast majority have a very similar coloration to the one you just picked up. The lighter coloration we most often see in hobby is the result of selective breeding to emphasize traits (like lighter/cleaner coloration, more intense oranges and pinks, etc).

    Keep in mind - darker colors tend to be more cryptic in the natural environment that the boa constrictor has adapted to. I'd wager an animal that looks more like yours would have a far greater chance of surviving and remaining hidden from both predators and prey in the neotropics than some of the morphs we've created in hobby by way of selective breeding. Imagine a captive bred hypo or albino boa laying curled against a tree compared to a "normal" boa... there is a reason these traits are far less common in nature. Cryptic, darker coloration is often favored if you aren't trying to be flashy with warning or courtship colors.
     
    geckolover22 likes this.
  3. geckolover22

    geckolover22 Well-Known Member

    That makes sense :0 so happeh I has a hog island now :3
    Just a problem he seems to kind of whistle when he breathes... I think only when he exhales.. there's no bubbling but it seems he only has one nostril to breathe out of the other seems closed off? Could it be stuck shed?
     
  4. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Its probably a result of dried secretions in the nostrils - pretty common this time of year for most areas when the colder weather sets in. Just keep an eye on the humidity make sure there are no problems with the next shed. Naturally you'll want to continue to monitor the boa's behavior and make sure it isn't an RI or something... let us know if you notice an secretions, lethargy, loss of weight or appetite and forced exhalations.
     
    geckolover22 likes this.
  5. geckolover22

    geckolover22 Well-Known Member

    I hope it's nothing.. dun want my lil guy sick he's too beautiful >:c
     
  6. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    Just make sure he is in quarantine for awhile "just in case." Always a good practice to quarantine new additions, especially before introducing to the same room as the rest of the collection. I'm sure its probably nothing, but better to be safe than sorry in ensuring his recovery and preventing transmission to the other snakes = )
     
  7. geckolover22

    geckolover22 Well-Known Member

    Yes that should be done >.< he's in the same area as my other snakes which I know should be a no-no
    I'll correct it asap
     
  8. geckolover22

    geckolover22 Well-Known Member

    heres his nostril thats clear
    snakes 043.JPG
    and the one thats sealed looking....
    snakes 042.JPG
    He's now making clicking and popping noises on occasion... slightly opening his mouth to breathe sometimes looks almost like just adjusting his jaws... no bubbles or drooling or anything like that... i've noticed too when he has a little trouble he seems to inflate his throat looking like a balloon :/ but other than that looks healthy... active clear eyes very iridescent sheen to his scales and he even ate today a mediumish rat with ease...
     
  9. JEFFREH

    JEFFREH Administrator Staff Member

    He's probably just having some difficulty breathing regularly with that nostril completely blocked and dried out. It should come off with the next shed, but you may able to be to encourage it to clear up manually with a bath and slightly higher ambient humidity (don't go overboard). I've also heard of some success using the shedding aid products available at pet stores and even artifical tears applied to the nostril to loosen it up. Just keep a close on it and if you notice any kind of behavioral change for the worse (lethargy, lack of appetite, secretions from mouth or nose, etc) then consider a vet appointment.

    Boa constrictors can utilize a wide range of habitat types in their natural range but aren't exposed to the winter lows and dryness we experience up in the states. Its actually somewhat common for some boas to develop these kinds of issues in the dry winter air... probably because they most often inhabit areas with relatively high ambient humidity (particularly these insular localities like the Hogs). Just keep an eye out, know what to look for in a healthy vs. diseased snake, and do what you can to make him as comofortable as possible. As you get used to the snake, you may be able to adjust some things in the future to accomodate the snake as the drier seasons set in. By the looks of things this nostril was probably blocked up before he was in your possession though.
     

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